Rolling in Fava Beans…

Mar 25, 2009

So, if you haven't grown Fava Beans before...You need too! This Vetch is even more effective at fixing Nitrogen in the soil than actual beans, is frost hardy, breaks up the soil, makes a great green manure AND produces super flavorful fruit. In Texas, you can seed this in fall and let them grow through the winter. Plants will bloom even through the cold weather then start producing fruit in Spring. The flowers are incredibly fragrant and when you break the pods open they have the same fragrance. Harvest the "peas" before you see them swelling too much in the pod, or harvest the entire pod early and eat whole. Make sure to save and dry some seed for your next fall planting. The foliage is also edible and tastes great mixed in with salads. Here are a couple of photos from my garden yesterday...

Fava_beans Favabeans

There are 12 comments for this entry

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Livia
Mar 26, 2009
11:13 am

They’re really pretty! I’ve never grown them before so I’ll have to figure out when the best time to plant them here in Kansas is. I doubt they’d make it through most winters here.

Leslie Halleck
Mar 26, 2009
11:14 am

Hey Livia! Hmmm, they can take low teen’s, but not sure beyond that. You could probably do an early spring, right after last frost seeding.

Michelle
Mar 26, 2009
12:54 pm

Your favas are looking fabulous! All mine are in full bloom right now but only a few tiny pods have set. I’ve been putting some blossoms in salads, beautiful, especially the crimson ones.

Paul Riddell
Mar 26, 2009
6:20 pm

I’m going to have to make some room for fava beans, and not just because Hannibal Lecter quotes will be a blessed relief from Audrey II quotes around the house.  I’ve always enjoyed them, and to find out how easy they are to grow in Dallas…yep, you’ve got me sold.

Paul Riddell
Mar 26, 2009
6:21 pm

By the way, Michelle, thank you for noting that the flowers are edible, too.  Five years ago, friends and relatives were looking at me as if I were insane when I’d tell them about redbud blooms being both edible and tasty (they taste like snow peas).  Today, they’re shoving me out of the way to get at the blooms.

islandgardener
Apr 08, 2009
11:13 pm

I’m so excited because my favas are just finally poking through!  There were 13 seeds in the packed and now 6 are coming through.  I think the plants are just so, so pretty—in a vegetble sort of way!

VINNIE INFANTINO
Jun 08, 2009
1:25 pm

I AM GROWING SOME FAVA BEANS IN MY VEG. GARDEN AND HAVE RECENTLY NOTICE SOME KIND OF BLACK CLUSTERS CLINGING TO THE STEM AT THE TOP OF THE PLANTS.ANYONE KNOW WHAT THIS IS?

amy
Jun 25, 2009
9:50 am

Does anyone know what the black eggs are- my husband thinks aphids, but I have never had aphids like this?  Also do the beans need steaking- the stems seems fragile?

Kerr Tung
Mar 06, 2010
12:59 am

I live in Mansfield, TX. Can I start the Fava Beans planting right now? I can hardly wait for the fall planting as suggested. Where do I get the seeds, from Asian supermarket?

Leslie Finical Halleck
Mar 08, 2010
12:18 pm

Hi Kerr, You can plant seeds of fava bean right now. Garden centers should carry the seed packets. I find that fava beans do much better in our climate if you seed them in fall, say mid-to late September. You’ll get much larger vigorous plants and much more fruit production. You’ll get production on spring planted crops, just not as much before it gets hot. They are very cold tolerant. My plants that I seeded lat-October (a bit late) took some damage from the 15-16 degree freezes we had, but have popped right back out. I’ll post some pictures shortly.

cookinwife
Mar 24, 2010
9:19 pm

I live in Alaska. When should I plant my beans. Should I start them indoors?

Leslie Finical Halleck
Apr 03, 2010
9:28 pm

Hi guys, sorry I just noticed there were some new comments on this post. In Alaska, I would imagine it might be to early to plant beans outside, but you could start them indoors right now for planting outdoors as soon as temps are mild. Maybe you could tell me a bit more about your weather right now?

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