Lots of Rain equals Lots of Pests!

Jun 20, 2016

I think most of us are still surprised by the amount of rain we're getting this spring, especially considering last year's downpours and flooding.  While rain is usually more than welcome around these parts, the excess spring rain has created some ral challenges this year. Rain yet to come will perpetuate them.


Be sure your rain barrels are covered to prevent mosquitoes from breeding.

Some of the issues you may be having in your garden as a result of all the extra moisture include increased insect and disease populations. Fungal diseases are especially happy right now. Black spot on roses, sooty mold on ligustrum, entomosporium leaf spot on photinias and Indian hawthorn to name a few.  Brown patch, gray leaf spot and take all root-rot are in just about every St. Augustine lawn in town. Reduce the frequency with which you’re watering and limit any supplemental watering to the early morning. Night watering breeds lots of fungus. If it’s rained in the last week, do not run your sprinklers.

Insects that have been a problem this spring include slugs, pill bugs and tent caterpillars. Slugs can be treated with Sluggo, a natural product, pill bugs can be knocked out with Spinosad and caterpillars treated with Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis).  Mosquito populations are also booming due to the consistent moisture. Mosquito larvae can also be killed using the granular form of Bt, available in both bits and dunks. This is the best method (besides eliminating standing water) to prevent mosquito infestations. Visit your favorite local garden center for great tips on how to handle these diseases, pests and treatments.

Remember that your established landscape (trees, shrubs, turf) only needs an average of 1” worth of rainfall per week; be it from actual rainfall or your irrigation system. Water-wise and drought tolerant plants need less. So as long as the rainfall continues, keep those irrigation systems turned off. Once the rain subsides, you can add back in a weekly watering if you feel your plants are beginning to show signs of stress; as well as watering your foundation. Twice-per-week lawn watering is typically only ever needed in late-July and August when temperatures soar to the 100s. Even then, healthy lawns with a deep root system won’t need watering that often. New plantings will require additional waterings until they root-in and become established. Remember that Dallas watering restrictions are permanent and are still in place despite the recent rains.

Even if you see our expansive clay soil cracking after heavy rains, realize that there is probably still a fair amount of moisture in the soil beneath those cracks. Those cracks are a result of the clay soil quickly shrinking at the surface as temperatures rise after heavy saturation.  Over-watering your lawns and landscapes will only lead to more root rot diseases and overblown insect problems.

Basil: Plant and Grow Your Own Pesto!

Jun 17, 2016

The basil is coming on strong in the summer garden and it’s time to start harvesting.

While its closest association is with Italian cooking, basil is actually native to India and used extensively in Indian cuisine. This fragrant and flavorful member of the mint family was originally only used for medicinal purposes. Basil tea was used to treat anything from digestive problems to headaches and anxiety. Today, basil is a culinary essential and there a multitude of varieties and flavors to choose from. With more than 150 species of basil currently grown around the world, the choices can be almost overwhelming. Scents and flavors range from lemon and anise to cinnamon. There are large-leafed sweet basils that grow large and bushy, small-leafed upright varieties such as ‘Sweet Aussie’ and even a tiny-leafed miniature variety called ‘Boxwood’. No matter your space or size of container, there is likely a Basil variety just right for you.


Basil ‘Boxwood’ has tiny leaves and a natural globe shape.

If you’re as addicted to making fresh pesto as I am then a regular supply of fresh basil in the garden is a must-have. Once you’ve made your own pesto, store-bought pesto just won’t do. The challenge with basil can be its tendency to go to flower and seed quickly and abundantly, leaving you with leggy plants that won’t continue producing much if any foliage. You’ll need to keep flower buds deadheaded proactively to keep plants producing new leaves. ‘Pesto Perpetuo’ is a variety that doesn’t flower, leaving you with an endless supply of fresh foliage to harvest.

If you haven’t yet planted your basil, you can do so all summer-long. Plants can be grown in patio containers or mixed into your ornamental and vegetable gardens. Basil needs a full sun location and semi-regular waterings to thrive.

Passion Flower: Prized Garden Possession

Jun 10, 2016

There are few flowers we grow here in Dallas that are as exotic and intriguing as the passion flower. If you happen to have a passion flower vine in your garden, then you’ve no doubt been enjoying an explosion of blooms. While the heavy rains have caused many homeowners and landscapes some serious grief, vines like passion flower have happily soaked it up. Vines have grown leaps and bounds over the last two months and the honey bees, bumble bees and other pollinators couldn’t be happier about it.


Passion flower quickly attaches to any nearby structure, be it a fence or arbor.

If you’re looking for a perennial vine that can quickly cover a structure, such as an unsightly fence or a featured arbor, passion flower vine is a wonderful choice. There are a number of species and varieties of Passiflora spp. available, with flower colors of white, blue, purple, pink, red and orange. Some passion flower varieties aren’t completely cold hardy here in Dallas; they may die down to the ground in winter, but typically reemerge the following spring.

Passiflora caerulea, or blue passion flower (pictured in the photos), is a cold hardy specimen that typically keeps most of it’s above-ground vines and foliage over winter in Dallas, depending on the weather.  Passiflora incarnata, also known as purple passion flower or may-pop, is one of the more cold hardy and popular species for our area. Both will host butterfly larvae and produce small fruits. If you want deep red flowers, Passiflora vitifolia is widely available, although plants aren’t quite as winter hardy.

If you’re looking to attract butterflies to your landscape, passion flower vine should be at the top of your shopping list. Gulf fritillary will flock to your vines en masse. They will lay their eggs on the vines, as it is a host plant, so be prepared for their caterpillars to munch on your plants a bit. Passion flower vine recovers quickly, so there’s no need to fret about any damage.

For the best results, plant passion flower vine on a southern exposure with plenty of direct sun. Plants can tolerate some dappled or late afternoon shade; too much shade will thin out the vines and limit blooms. Be prepared for vines to grow large and assertively. They’ll attach themselves with spiraling tendrils to any nearby structure. Now is the best time to find a good selection of passion flower at your local garden center.

EmergentLive: From Passion to Profession BLAB session

May 18, 2016

Are you a horticulture or landscape student, young green industry professional, experienced pro or transitioning careers?

Perception of value in the green industry is a tough topic. Often, young professionals struggle to find a path to the type of career or earnings they want. Experienced pros may not be demanding enough professional respect for the career they are passionat about...and amateur gardeners who want to transition into the green industry profession may not understand what it really takes. I'll be joining the Emergent in Horticulture gang Tuesday night BLAB session to offer my thoughts, experience and strategies to "move from passion to profession" in the green industry. Tuesday, May 24th 7pm, Central time, 8pm Eastern.

Here is the LINK to the live session

Not familiar with BLAB? It's like a podcast, but in live video! You can login with your Twitter or Facebook account, watch the conversation, post questions for us and even join in if selected. BLAB can be used on your computer, or download the app on your phone or iPad. 

The Emergent Facebook group, which is for those working professionally in the horticulture industry (or industry related students) can be found HERE
 

Prevent Mosquitoes Now!

May 16, 2016

Mosquitoes are a fact of life here in Dallas, but this year it looks like we’re in for a bumper crop. The mild weather and additional rainfall this spring means a healthy crop of Mosquitoes. They are coming out in droves and are going to make it tough for you to enjoy any outdoor time once the rains pass.

While you may feel there is little you can do to stop the mosquito invasion, there are actually some simple treatments you can use to stop mosquitoes in their tracks.  While adult mosquitoes can be sprayed with chemical treatments, or repelled with natural sprays, it can be difficult to successfully control them in this manner. Prevention is always the best medicine.

All it takes is a few handfuls of a natural larvicide to successfully prevent mosquitoes in your landscape.

Bt (Bacillius thuringiensis var. israelensis) also known as Thuricide (liquid form) or Mosquito Bits, is an all natural and amazingly effective preventative treatment for mosquitoes. This naturally occurring bacteria is fatal only to larvae and caterpillars. The species included in this product is particularly effective against Mosquito larvae (and fungus gnats). All you have to do is sprinkle a few handfuls of the bits under your foundation shrubs, any landscape beds with automated irrigation or that you water regularly, drain boxes, low spots in the yard and even gutters.

It’s a good idea to start putting out your Mosquito Bits in April and continue doing so monthly through September.

The Bt attacks the mosquito larvae and kills them before they even have a chance to mature. This bacteria is safe for children, pets, birds and fish. It’s the most non-toxic and most effective treatment for dealing with Mosquitoes.

If you live on a creek, pitch a Mosquito Dunk in it once per month to help control the population. Pass it on to your neighbors and ask they do the same. Do the same for ponds, birdbaths, abandoned pools, or any other standing bodies of water in your neighborhood.

Hopefully, you haven’t been contributing to the moisture problem by running your sprinkler systems when it's already rained...or is currently raining. All it takes is a small puddle of water for new mosquitoes to breed. When soils are already saturated, excess irrigation will only make the problem worse.

Preventing mosquitoes now is the best way to prevent a serious infestation problem this summer.

Time for Tropicals

May 11, 2016

If you’re looking to create a tropical feel in your landscape, now’s the time. The bit of sunshine we’re finally getting combined with the high humidity is certainly making Dallas feel pretty tropical right now.  May through early June is prime time for you snap up your favorite tropical plants at your local garden center. Tropical hibiscus, mandevilla, allamanda and bouganvilla are just a few of the most popular tropicals you’ll find. But there are so many more to choose from.

I love to use blooming and foliage tropicals in containers for an instant feeling of lushness in the landscape. Most tropicals make excellent container specimens so they’re the perfect choice if you need to quickly spruce up the patio for a party or your Memorial Day holiday weekend.

Tropical hibiscus are available in a dizzying array of colors and add the most tropical feel to any space. You can plant tropical hibiscus in containers alongside sweet potato vine or other trailing foliage plants. Or, plant them directly into the landscape as a feature in a sunny bed. If you’re planting in-ground, be sure you’ve amended your landscape beds with plenty of compost and some expanded shale to aid drainage. Fertilize regularly to keep plants in bloom.


Firebush loves the heat.

If you’re looking for a tropical that’s irresistible to hummingbirds, Firebush tops the list (Hamelia patens).  This tough, heat loving tropical brings butterflies and hummingbirds to your garden in droves. Firebush offers pretty green foliage and tufts of tubular red-orange blooms. A wonderful plant for both landscapes and patio containers. Plant in a sunny location and provide some supplemental water through summer.


Of course, my favorite Esperanza is ORANGE.

Another hummingbird-favored tropical, or semi-tropical, is Esperanza (Tecoma stans). While plants will sometimes through the winter in our Dallas gardens, often times you’ll lose them to a hard freeze. But that’s ok, because they’ll bloom non-stop until we hit freezing weather.  Esperanza is available in shades of bright yellow, to orange, to almost red.

Hummingbirds will make a beeline for this Esperanza whether it’s in a patio container or in the landscape. Plants require little care to look beautiful.

There are so many beautiful tropicals to choose from right now that I could never list all of my favorites. There are many tropicals that may not bloom conspicuously, but rather offer up wonderful foliage color and contrast. Be sure the bloomers get a sunny location and the foliage tropicals a bit of afternoon shade. You know all those tropical foliage houseplants you love? Any of them can be planted outdoors in patio containers and even the landscape if you give them some afternoon shade. Some of the most beautiful tropical containers are created by mixing unusual foliage tropicals with bright bloomers

Perennial Plant Association Southern Region Symposium ‘16: Sustainable Style

Apr 8, 2016

Are you a landscape designer, landscape contractor, plant grower, garden center retailer or garden writer in The South? If so, you probably face growing challenges when it comes to navigating the impact of extreme weather conditions while still creating beautiful landscapes and growing a healthy business. Intense heat, drought, and flooding are impacting how companies do business, the landscapes they create, and what plants they grow and sell.

FOR: Landscape designers, Landscape Architects, Landscape Contractors, Plant Growers, Garden Center Retailers, Plant Brokers, Public Garden Professionals, City Horticulturists, Educators, Pro Garden Writers, Allied Trade, Green Industry Students.

WHEN: Friday, October 7th, 2016. 8:20am-5pm. Sign-in 7:30am-8:20am A great opportunity to tour the gardens before they open to the public.

WHERE:  Dallas Arboretum & Botanical Garden, Rosine Hall, 8525 Garland Rd., Dallas, TX 75218

The Perennial Plant Association (PPA) and their Southern Region Director, Leslie Halleck, have brought together an inspiring and knowledgeable group of speakers to address sustainability issues, with landscape aesthetics in mind. It’s all about sustainable style. With a focus on perennial plants, speakers will cover topics such as stylish heat and drought tolerant plant selections, organic versus sustainable plant production for growers, an update on rose rosette disease and using plants with a purpose. The 2016 Sustainable Style event is an excellent opportunity for green industry professionals to stay on top of continuing education and sustainability trends as well as take advantage of a unique industry networking opportunity.

Tickets include entry into the Dallas Arboretum, coffee, snacks and lunch from Noon-1pm:

  • $99 PPA Members
  • $50 Industry Students
  • $149 Non-Members

Earn CEUs

  • TNLA– 5 CEUs
  • APLD– 5 CEUs
  • NALP– 4 CEUs

12:30-1:30 Dallas Arboretum staff will be on hand for attendees as they tour the trial gardens to see how specific plants are performing under extreme southern growing conditions.

Event Sponsors include: Halleck Horticultural, North Haven Gardens, Dallas Arboretum & Botanical Garden, Local Plant Source, Eason Horticultural Resources, Inc., Southwest Perennials, Inc., Living Earth.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER ONLINE

Our Speakers for the Day:

Kelly Norris, Author “Plants with Style”, Director of Horticulture,
Greater Des Moines Botanical Garden
3:15PM - 4:30PM  Plants with Style

Gardeners need chic, sustainable, thriving plants for modern lifestyles. Why settle for lackluster gardens filled with dull, ho-hum plants? Plants after all are the very essence of fashionable gardening. In this spirited, provocative lecture, 20-something plantsman Kelly Norris calls for a garden revolution: Out with boring plants and in with stylish alternatives that captivate and enthrall.  A passionate horticulturist and lifelong gardener, Kelly is the ideal guide to the botanical riches available to today’s gardeners. In chapters on environment, structure, seasonal standouts, and plant combinations he shines a spotlight on the A-list plants in every category—plants that will thrive, not merely survive. Along the way, he shows you how to forge a personal style in harmony with your garden’s setting and local environment. As Kelly puts it, “A garden is the best way to savor life on earth. (+ Public Day)

Lloyd Traven, Owner, Peace Tree Farm
1:45PM – 3:00PM Organic Versus Sustainable Plant Production

Sustainable, organic, Certified Organic, Naturally-Grown, MPS, Veriflora, GAP-Certified, GMO-Free, local, Fair Trade, so many names, so many initials, but do they actually mean something? Well, some REALLY do, and some are just 'feel-good', but how do you know the difference, and how do we convey the reality to the consumer? Let's talk about what they mean and what matters. Let's be blunt--as if Lloyd ever filters what he says!!--sustainable and Certified Organic both have meaning as well as great real value, but are often in direct opposition to each other, and it is important to decide what you need and what your customer really wants you to do, so how do we make them coexist? Real world techniques for growers and retailers, concentrating on propagation and potted perennial production. He covers insect pests, while focusing on sanitation, disease complexes and thwarting them without harsh chemicals. They are also practices you can use to show your customers, retail or wholesale, that you care about them, the planet, and the future. (+ Public Day)

Presented by Eason Horticultural Resources
Susan Martin, Owner of Gardner Sue’s News
10:40AM - 11:50AM Moving Beyond Pretty: Plants with Bonus Points

When the plant catalogs begin to arrive, our eyes are filled with botanical eye candy of every color, shape and size. We want them all, of course. The challenge is to look beyond the pretty flowers and actively seek out perennial plants that deliver more…more color in shade, food for pollinators, greater durability, and visual interest through all four seasons. As you begin to see plants from a new perspective, consider developing new ways of marketing and merchandising them according to the benefits they offer, not just their pretty colors. We’re moving beyond pretty and into the realm of more.

 

Presented by Southwest Perennials, Inc.
Dr. Kevin Ong, Associate Professor & Extension Plant Pathologist, Texas A&M University
9:45AM – 10:30AM Rose Rosette Disease Update

What do we really know about rose rosette disease? There is much information that is circulated and various treatment suggestions are claimed as effective. But what do we really know about this disease? We will explore historical scientific data to see what was said and proven previously, and how this information forms the basis of current work and progress on this disease, the pathogen and vector that transmit the pathogen. An update of current research in rose rosette will be shared.

 

Presented by Living Earth
Andrea DeLong-Amaya, Director of Horticulture, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
8:30am-9:30am Native Plants for Southern Landscapes

Are you interested in saving water, reducing pesticide and fertilizer use, and improving the wildlife habitat on your property but don’t want a “zeroscape”? Andrea DeLong-Amaya, director of horticulture at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin, Texas, will introduce you to a high performing southern native perennial plants suitable for various home landscape situations to help you achieve your landscape goals. Understanding ideal growing conditions, best maintenance techniques for each species, and where to look for more gardening guidance is critical for success and will also be discussed in this presentation. (+ Public Day)

Get Ready for Hummingbirds in the Garden

Mar 29, 2016

With such a warm winter behind us here in Dallas, we might be seeing hummingbirds in the garden any day now. Do you have the right kinds of plants in your lanscape to attract and feed these the tiny beauties?


Crossvine is typically one of the blooming plants to attract nesting hummingbirds.

The species of hummingbirds that we see here in Dallas, ruby-throated and black-chinned hummingbirds, spend their winters in Mexico and Central America. Hummingbirds typically begin arriving in the Dallas area in late-March; usually just in time to take advantage of blooming plants like crossvine (in full bloom right now) coral honeysuckle and buckeyes. The autumn sage are already blooming, which will definitely capture their attention.


White autumn sage, and salvias of all kinds, attract hummingbirds.

If you want to attract hummingbirds to your garden and you haven’t yet put out feeders, now’s the time. Plants hummingbirds love typically produce tubular flowers that accommodate their long tongues. While hot colored flowers (red, orange, yellow), tend to be preferred, the hummingbirds in my yard are just as happy to feed on white, blue and purple salvias.

In order to see an abundance of hummingbirds in your garden, you need to attract a female to nest in spring. By putting out hummingbird feeders late-March and planting specific spring-blooming plants, you can entice a female to take up residence nearby if other conditions are right. Plants they love in Dallas gardens include esparanza, crossvine, salvia, honeysuckle, columbine and red yucca.


Back to top

Tips in your inbox

E-Newsletter

Sign up for the E-Newsletter for industry info, gardening trends & tips.